American Muslim Voters And The 2016 Election

AMERICAN MUSLIM VOTERS AND THE 2016 ELECTION

A Demographic Profile and Survey of Attitudes

 

Released: October 13, 2016

Conducted by Triton Polling & Research

www.tritonpolling.com

Report Author: Robert S. McCaw

CAIR Director of Government Affairs Department

Commissioned by Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR)

453 New Jersey Avenue, S.E. Washington, D.C. 20003

Tel 202.488.8787 Fax 202.288.0833

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Twitter: @CAIRNational

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download CAIR 2016 Election Report


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Brief on Countering Violent Extremism (CVE)

Produced by the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR)
Updated: July 2015

What is Countering Violent Extremism (CVE)?
In part due to the field's recent expansion, there is no consensus definition of CVE, including from the administration. One working definition is "the use of non-coercive means to dissuade individuals or groups from mobilizing towards violence and to mitigate recruitment, support, facilitation or engagement in ideologically motivated terrorism by non-state actors in furtherance of political objectives."

CVE components include intervening in an individual's path toward violent extremism, interdicting in criminal activity and reintegrating those convicted of criminal activity into society.

Isn't CVE a good thing?
The government's CVE initiative raises many issues. They include concerns that government-led CVE is not an effective use of public resources, that it often relies on subjective measures and its efficacy is questionable. Observers note that CVE is generally driven by news events, that the current program exclusively targets American Muslims and find that claims that the government is targeting all forms of violent extremism are inconsistently supported.  There are arguments that the current CVE initiative undermines our national ideals, such as government not having a role in the free exercise of religion.

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CAIR Recommendations to PCLOB on Government Watchlists, Surveillance, Profiling

July 23, 2014

CAIR Statement of Views on Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board Mid-term and Long-term Agenda

by Robert McCaw

Good afternoon. My name is Robert McCaw and I am the government affairs department manager for the Council on American-Islamic Relations, the nation's largest Muslim civil rights and advocacy organization.

CAIR appreciates this opportunity to address the PCLOB and provide its views and recommendations on what civil liberties issues the board should address in its mid-term and long-term agenda.

A number of the issues I raise today take into account the troubling impacts of certain national security programs on the privacy and civil liberties rights of Arab, South Asian, Muslim, and Sikh Americans.

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Support Comprehensive Immigration Reform Legislation

Avoid Piecemeal Anti-Immigrant Bills & Amendments

The U.S. House of Representatives Should Support Comprehensive Immigration Reform

  • In July the U.S. Senate adopted the bipartisan Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act, S. 744, which provides a pathway to citizenship for the nation’s 11 million undocumented immigrants. While this act is far from perfect, the fight for inclusive immigration reform now turns to the U.S. House of Representatives.
  • CAIR urges House representatives to reject piecemeal measures that would increase racial profiling, unconstitutional detention and militarization of the U.S. border. Rather, Congress should adopt comprehensive immigration reform that provides a framework for undocumented immigrants in the U.S. to obtain legal status and eventual citizenship.

Congress Should Oppose State-Based Immigration Reform, Like H.R. 2278, i.e. the “Safe Act”

  • Piecemeal immigration reform that includes anti-immigrant measure are "poison pills" intended to stop the immigration reform process.
  • In July, the Strengthen and Fortify Enforcement Act, “SAFE Act," H.R. 2278, introduced by Rep. Trey Gowdy (R-SC) was adopted by the House Judiciary committee and referred to the House floor. This act promotes an enforcement-only approach that would criminalize all undocumented persons in the U.S., effectively barring the millions of individuals and families eligible to apply for legalization under the Senate’s already adopted immigration bill.
  • This act also mirrors Arizona’s anti-immigrant law S.B. 1070, by authorizing states and local authorities to enforce federal immigration laws while proving Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers with greater detention and deportation authorities.
  • Congress should reject this act as enhanced state immigration authorities have led to abuse, racial profiling and an increase in the detention and deportation of undocumented U.S. residents seeking citizenship.

Comprehensive Immigration Reform Should Include a Ban on Racial, Religious Profiling

  • The House should adopt comprehensive immigration reform that addresses the serious problem of racial and religious profiling by federal law enforcement agencies – a problem which affects immigrant and minority communities alike. Such a ban on law enforcement profiling would:
    • Prohibit federal officers from engaging in acts of profiling based on religion or national origin.
    • Close loopholes that permit federal officers to profile at the border and for reasons of national security.
    • Remove any language that requires immigration legalization applicants from certain regions or countries to undergo additional security screenings, background checks.
  • While Section 3305 of S. 744 prohibits the blanket use of race and ethnicity by federal law enforcement, it fails to prohibit profiling based on religion or national origin and includes troubling exemptions in cases of national security and border protection.

Congress Should Oppose Screening Measures that Single Out Certain Nationalities

  • All immigrants, regardless of national origin, should be treated equally. That is why Congress should to reject redundant screening measures, like those found in Section 2101 of S. 744.
  • Section 2101, among other things, would require immigration legalization applicants from certain regions or countries to undergo additional screenings, i.e., background checks, out of national security concerns.
  • Introduced by Senator Lindsey Graham (R-SC), this provision is reminiscent of the now-defunct and discredited National Security Entry-Exit System (NSEERS) program, which had required certain nonimmigrant men from predominantly Muslim nations to register with the federal government.

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campaign islamophobia

CAIR’s department to monitor and combat Islamophobia tracks sources and incidents of Islamophobia across the country, creates dossiers on prominent Islamophobes, and produces factsheets to debunk false information that has been spread about Islam.

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