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Kolbe should rescind invitation to contoversial speaker

Nathan-LeanNathan Lean, Napa Valley Register

During the last weekend in July, The Kolbe Academy, a Catholic homeschool program located in Napa, will host a conference in Sacramento where educators and home school instructors will gather to discuss how they can "engage the culture in a year of faith."

Ordinarily, such a program would come and go unnoticed. But this year, featured amongst a lineup of distinguished speakers, is a controversial anti-Muslim blogger who civil rights organizations have labeled a "hate group leader."

His scheduled appearance casts a negative light on what should be a positive event. It also raises questions about why a man whose writing was cited thirteen dozen times by the Norway terrorist Anders Breivik, a man who slaughtered 77 youth campers in Oslo in 2010, was ever invited to speak about youth education in the first place.

Robert Spencer, a Catholic deacon from New Hampshire and director of the blog Jihad Watch, is set to appear as part of a speaking lineup that includes prominent clergy and educators from all across the United States. Once the director of Kolbe Academy, where he also served as a classics teacher, his publications include "Classical Education in the Contemporary World" and "How to Introduce Your Child to Classical Music in 52 Easy Lessons."

In recent years, though, his focus on Bach, Beethoven and the teachings of St. Ignatius have given way to a more pernicious fixation: "creeping Sharia," "stealth jihad," and the supposed threat of radical Muslims in the United States.

Spencer’s imbalanced writings on Islam, which focus entirely on violence, and his work alongside anti-Muslim activist Pamela Geller, have led the federal government to reject the trademark application for his hate group, Stop the Islamization of America.

The ruling states that the group disparages Muslims. Given that one board member once recommended burning all mosques and sending Muslim immigrants "back to their countries," it’s not hard to see why.

Spencer has argued that there is no distinction between American Muslims and radical, violent jihadists and, to that end, he’s marshaled public stunts that seek to advance that wild claim.

He and Geller were behind the raucous Park 51 protests in Manhattan in 2010, and the duo recently took their battle to metro and bus stops in major metropolitan cities, including Washington, D.C., San Francisco, and New York.

Controversial advertisements sponsored by the pair equated Muslims with savages and presented violent acts of notorious terrorists like Osama bin Laden as normative of the world’s 1.3 billion Muslims.

At a recent town forum on Muslim civil liberties in Tennessee, their supporters shouted down speakers and verbally abused police officers. Now, ahead of a scheduled trip to Woolwich, London, where they plan to team up with the English Defence League, a European street gang with a long history of criminal activity, the British government’s homeland secretary is considering a travel ban.

All of this begs very obvious questions: Is this the type of person with whom the Kolbe Academy and Catholic homeschoolers in California want to be associated? What could Spencer possibly say about classical education or Catholic values that would eclipse his stature as man listed alongside the KKK and neo-Nazi groups on hate watch lists? (Read the full article)

Nathan Lean is the editor-in-chief of Asian Media, and a researcher at Georgetown University’s Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding in Washington, D.C.

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