IN: College Students Keep Faith in Islam


On 1319 S. Sixth St. stands the Islamic Center of Terre Haute, a haven for Muslim students around campus finding faith farther from home.

"All throughout high school I had plenty of good friends that were followers of Islam," said Brian Morrow, a freshman open preference major. "I truly believe that it is the correct way of life and it makes the most sense to me."

Morrow, a former Christian, converted to Islam in late August 2007. He said that in Islam there is no governing body except God, meaning no one can condemn, judge or punish another for actions if they do not infringe on the rights of others.

"It turns out that Islam had always agreed with what I believed as a Christian," Morrow said. "I always believed that Jesus was God's messenger rather than God in the flesh and that none other should be placed equal to God. Also, in July of last year I stopped eating pork. I figured God didn't want the Hebrews to consume this for some reason. Then I stopped getting sick, lost weight and felt way more lively."

According to religious tolerance.org, Muslims believe in the revelations of prophets including Mohammad Abraham, Moses and Jesus. Their religious faith does not embody the idea that God took human form, nor does it follow any other written word other than the Quran.

"Islam truly is a beautiful way of life despite the slandering on television," Morrow said. "After I (converted), I found out that there were more followers of Islam in the world than Catholics and our numbers are rapidly growing. Islam is the world's second largest religion, and I'm proud to say that I am a part of it."

 


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