MI: Unfair Detentions Rise at US-Canada Border


MI: UNFAIR DETENTIONS RISE AT US-CANADA BORDER

EDITOR'S NOTE: Males of Middle Eastern descent feel humiliated by Homeland Security agents' practice of summarily detaining, handcuffing and questioning at the Northern border, reports Rashida Tlaib, advocacy coordinator of the Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services in Detroit, Michigan. IMMIGRATION MATTERS regularly features the views of the nation's leading immigrant rights advocates.

DETROIT -- Americans of Middle Eastern background are being stopped and questioned more frequently by Homeland Security agents at the U.S./Canada border.

Community advocates are noting that a familiar pattern has emerged at the crossing.

American males of Middle Eastern background in their late 30s are removed from their vehicles, handcuffed and interrogated for hours. Some report being dragged out of their cars and handcuffed throughout the interrogation period.

No reason or apology is given afterwards. Instead, a complaint form is given out, to be filled and sent to the Department of Homeland Security. Going through such an ordeal is most disturbing to those traveling with their spouses and young children.

"My children saw their father being taken away like a criminal," says Ibrahim Dabdoub, 38, of Maumee, Ohio. Dabdoub has been detained more than three times as he returned from Canada after visiting his parents and in-laws in
Windsor.

Most recently, the border patrol officers actually remembered his name and yet continued to go through the same steps of detention and interrogation.

"I have never been in trouble with the law," says Dabdoub, "I have never been arrested. I have a reputation with my family, close friends and business associates as being a stickler for following rules and valuing the integrity of the law."

 


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