Press Releases

CAIR Supports Call to Close Gitmo

(WASHINGTON, D.C., 5/19/2006) – A prominent national Islamic civil rights and advocacy group today echoed a U.N. agency’s call to shut down the Guantanamo Bay Camp X-Ray detention facility and to ban “torture” of security detainees.

The Washington-Based Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) issued that call after the Committee Against Torture (CAT), the United Nations top anti-torture body, said such facilities were illegal and should be closed.

In its first review of U.S. policy since the start of the war on terrorism, the committee also urged President Bush to ban interrogation methods such as “water boarding,” sexual humiliation and the use of dogs to induce fear.

SEE: U.N. Panel Backs Closing Prison at Guantánamo http://www.nytimes.com/2006/05/19/world/19cnd-torture.html

“Indefinite detention of those who have insufficient access to legal safeguards does not reflect American principles,” said CAIR Government Affairs Director Corey Saylor. “Many Americans of all faiths are concerned that conditions at Guantanamo Bay and at secret prisons worldwide constitute a violation of the U.N. Convention Against Torture and should be shut down.”

In April of last year, CAIR and other groups called for an independent 9/11 commission-style investigation into the use of torture by American military personnel. SEE: http://www.cair-net.org/antitorture/. CAIR also urged Americans to contact their elected representatives and ask that a ban on torture by U.S. military personnel be sent to President Bush.

CAIR, America’s largest Muslim civil liberties group, has 32 offices, chapters and affiliates nationwide and in Canada. Its mission is to enhance the understanding of Islam, encourage dialogue, protect civil liberties, empower American Muslims, and build coalitions that promote justice and mutual understanding.

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CONTACT: Rabiah Ahmed, 202-488-8787 or 202-439-1441, E-Mail: rahmed@cair-net.org; Ibrahim Hooper, 202-488-8787 or 202-744-7726, E-Mail: ihooper@cair-net.org.

 

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