Time Report Fuels Guantanamo Criticism


WASHINGTON -- The U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay drew fresh criticism Sunday following a Time magazine report on a logbook tracing the treatment of a detainee who officials believe was intended to take part in the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. Time's report on the treatment received by Mohammed al-Qahtani prompted a quick defense from the Pentagon along with outrage
from several members of Congress. Al-Qahtani was denied entry to the United States by an immigration officer in August 2001 and later captured in Afghanistan and sent to the detention camp at the U.S. naval base in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The 84-page logbook obtained by Time and authenticated by Pentagon spokesman Larry Di Rita is the "kind of document that was never meant to leave Gitmo," a senior Pentagon official told the magazine.

According to the logbook, which covers al-Qahtani's interrogations from November 2002 to January 2003, the Time article reports that daily interviews began at 4 a.m. and sometimes continued until midnight. The interrogation techniques included refusing al-Qahtani a bathroom break and forcing him to urinate in his pants. "It's not appropriate," said Sen. Chuck Hagel on CNN's "Late Edition." "It's not at all within the standards of who
we are as a civilized people, what our laws are. "If in fact we are treating prisoners this way, it's not only wrong, it's dangerous and very dumb and very shortsighted," the Nebraska Republican said. "This is not how you win the people of the world over to our side, especially the Muslim world." (MORE)

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