Why It's Vital to Get the Truth About Ibragim Todashev's Killing

Todashev-fatherIt's been almost three months since he was shot by the FBI. The public still has no clear explanation of what happened.
Conor Friedersdorf, The Atlantic

Earlier this summer, the FBI shot and killed Ibragim Todashev at his Orlando, Florida, apartment, where he was being questioned by law-enforcement officials. Afterward, police sources gave wildly conflicting accounts of what happened just before his death

: Some said he was unarmed but agitated; others said he was armed, but disagreed about the weapon. Did he reach for a gun? A samurai sword? A knife? A metal pole? A broomstick? Every news report seemed to tell a different story. The FBI wouldn't go on record with an official version of events, and was unusually tight-lipped about the case, even as the dead man's grieving father speculated that his son was murdered. The ACLU, the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), and various newspaper editorial boards called for an independent investigation, in part because when the FBI investigates itself, its agents are basically always found blameless for fatal shootings.

Then the story faded from national headlines.

Two and a half months later, the FBI has yet to release the results of its investigation. The Boston Globe, Orlando Sentinel, and CAIR have kept pressing for answers. It's time that the rest of us rejoin them. Perhaps the FBI will ultimately produce evidence that clears those present of culpability. Until then, America's federal police force has killed a man, clammed up, and offered no answers for going on three months!

That should never happen. And when it does, the public should demand answers. ...

Whatever happened in that Orlando apartment -- and it is totally possible that the police didn't do anything wrong -- this case is going to send a strong signal to FBI agents all over America about the degree of scrutiny they'll face when they kill someone under suspicious circumstances. Most FBI agents are honest. But I'd like the few who aren't to know they'll always be subject to thorough, independent investigations and public scrutiny. And I'd like grieving men like Ibragim's father to be confident that they got the truth, whatever it turns out to be. (Read the full article)


Be the first to comment

Please check your e-mail for a link to activate your account.