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CAIR-NY: Pace University Announces Campaign Against Hate

CAIR-NY: PACE UNIVERSITY ANNOUNCES ON-CAMPUS CAMPAIGN AGAINST HATE, PROMOTING RESPECT AND UNDERSTANDING

CONTACT: Christopher T. Cory, Executive Director, Public Information, Pace University
212-346-1117, ccory@pace.edu, cell 917-608-8164

Note: Most sessions are open to media with press credentials. Please contact the Public Information office for details.

“Not on My Watch” goal is to “encourage all of us to take responsibility,” says President David A. Caputo

New York, NY and Pleasantville, NY, November 14, 2006 – In the wake of incidents in which two copies of the Qur’an were found in toilets and other racial and ethnic slurs were found on its campuses, Pace University today announced the start of a campaign to intensify its traditional acceptance of all groups on campus regardless of religion, race, ethnicity or gender orientation.

The incidents are under police investigation as hate crimes. President David A. Caputo, called the campaign “comprehensive and pro-active.”

The effort is known as “Not on My Watch.” Caputo said the name stresses the need for active cooperation from each member of the community, in actions ranging from understanding others to reporting incidents. “The goal is to encourage all of us to take responsibility,” he said.

In its first few weeks, “Not on My Watch” will comprise

* A three- hour panel discussion on sacred texts in all religions, including the Bible and the Qur’an, on November 20 in Lecture Hall North, One Pace Plaza, from 6 to 9 p.m. Taught by faculty members in the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies, the discussion will explore: What is a sacred text?; How does reading a sacred text differ from reading a secular text?; What – if any – responsibilities do we have to texts that other people hold sacred?; Is it possible to desecrate a sacred text?

* Two hour teach-ins on the Westchester campus in Pleasantville Tuesday, November 28, from 1-3 pm, and on the downtown New York City campus Thursday, November 30, from 3 to 5 pm. A faculty panel will discuss the meaning of hate crimes and the impact that they have on the community. In addition, the sessions will provide an open forum for dialogue about the recent incidents and an opportunity for questions about different cultures, groups, or practices. Information on Islam has been developed in consultation with the Council on American-Islamic Relations.

 

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